• COMPUTER BASICS SEMESTER 1

    Instructor: Hathaway, E.

    Computer Basics introduces students to the inner workings of computer and network hardware through projects and hands-on lessons. Students will learn about basic computing and Internet knowledge and skills required for basic use of computer hardware, software, networks, and the Internet. Students will be introduced to computer science practices and how these are relevant in today’s world. 

Announcements

  • Random Thoughts

    Watch your thoughts, they become words. Watch your words, they become actions. Watch your actions, they become habits. Watch your habits, they become your character. Watch your character, it becomes your destiny. —Anonymous

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  • Chapter 6 Objectives

    How can I determine whether I should upgrade my existing computer or buy a new one? What does the CPU do, and how can I evaluate its performance? How does memory work in my computer, and how can I evaluate how much memory I need? What are the computer’s main storage devices, and how can I evaluate whether they match my needs? What components affect the output of video on my computer, and how can I evaluate whether they match my needs? What components affect my computer’s sound quality, and how can I evaluate whether they match my needs? How can I improve the reliability of my…

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  • Chapter 5 Objectives

    What software is included in system software? What are the different kinds of operating systems? What are the most common operating systems? How does the operating system provide a means for users to interact with the computer? How does the operating system help manage resources such as the processor, memory, storage, hardware, and peripheral devices? How does the operating system interact with application software? How does the operating system help the computer start up? What are the main desktop and window features? How does the operating system help me keep my computer organized? What utility programs are included in system software, and what do they…

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  • Participation

    Please note I will use this rubric in grading you for participation during class time. 

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  • Critical Thinking

    Critical thinking has been described as “reasonable reflective thinking focused on deciding what to believe or do.”[2] It has also been described as "thinking about thinking."[3] It has been described in more detail as "the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action".[4] More recently, critical thinking has been described as "the process of purposeful, self-regulatory judgment, which uses reasoned consideration to evidence, context, conceptualizations, methods, and criteria."[5] Within the critical social theory philosophical frame, critical thinking is commonly understood to involve commitment to the social and political practice of participatory democracy, willingness to imagine or remain open to considering alternative perspectives, willingness to integrate new or revised perspectives into our ways of thinking and acting, and willingness to foster criticality in others. …

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  • Chapter 4 Objectives

    What’s the difference between application software and system software? What kinds of applications are included in productivity software? What are the different types of multimedia software? What are the different types of entertainment software?  What are the different types of drawing software? What kinds of software do small and large businesses use? Where can I go for help when I have a problem with my software? How can I purchase software or get it for free? ) How do I install, uninstall, and start…

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  • Chapter 3 Objectives

    What is the origin of the Internet? How can I communicate through the Internet? How can I communicate and collaborate using Web 2.0 technologies? What are the various kinds of multimedia files found on the Web, and what software do I need to use them? What is e-commerce, and what e-commerce safeguards protect me when I’m online?  What is a Web browser, and what is a URL and what are its parts?  How can I use hyperlinks and other tools to get around the Web?  How do I search the Internet effectively, and how can I evaluate Web sites? How does data travel on the Internet? What are my options for connecting to the…

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  • Chapter 1 Objectives

     Why Computers Matter to You - Becoming Computer Literate 1. What does it mean to be "computer literate"? 2. How does being computer literate make you a savy computer user and consumer? 3. How can becoming computer literate help you in a career? 4. How can becoming computer literate help you understand and take advantage of newly emerging careers? 5. How does becoming computer literate help you deal with challenges associated with…

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  • Chapter 2 Objectives

    What exactly is a computer, and what are its four main functions? What is the difference between data and information? What are bits and bytes, and how are they measured? What devices do I use to get data into the computer? What devices do I use to get information out of the computer? What’s on the motherboard? Where are information and programs stored? How are devices connected to the computer? How do I set up my computer to avoid strain and…

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  • Writing Assignment

    Write a one page response to the reading "Why computers matter to me - The importance of being computer literate".  Use information presented in the reading, personal perspective and topics already discussed in class. As you write, remember to: Focus on future technology and how will it impact your professional life. Organize your ideas and details effectively. Include specific details that clearly develop your paper Use standard grammar, punctuations and…

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Discussion Topics

  • Survey

    Posted by Edmund Hathaway on 2/3/2014 2:07:17 PM
    Comments (0)
  • Responding to Ethical Scenarios

    Posted by Edmund Hathaway on 11/12/2013 7:59:00 AM

    Instructions

    You will be put into 4 groups.  Each group will be assigned all of the following scenarios to read and discuss.  Then, each group should follow the steps below for making ethical decisions.  Each group will select a recorder.  The recorder will write down everyone’s name in the group on a sheet of paper and the record the group’s responses for each scenario presented below.  Each group should select a feasible alternative and be prepared to discuss their reasoning for selecting that alternative with the class.

    Scenarios

    For all the scenarios, assume you are employed by Westerly High Computer Systems, a large computer manufacturing company with approximately 1000 employees. The company is located in a large metropolitan area.

     Steps for Making Ethical Decisions

    1.       Identify the ethical issue or problem.

    Steps for Making Ethical Decisions

    1. Identify the ethical issue or problem.
    2. List the facts that have the most bearing on the decision.
    3. Identify anyone who might be affected by your decision and how
    4. Explain what each affected person would want you to do about the issue
    5. List three alternative actions and identify the best and worst case scenario for each alternative, anyone who would be harmed by this choice (and how), any values that would be compromised by selecting this alternative and any automatic reasons why this alternative should not be selected (legal issues, rules, etc.).
    6. Determine a course of action

    Case 1:  Lorna is an administrative assistant in the Human Resource Department.  Her good friend, Bill, is applying for a job with the company and she has agreed to serve as a reference for him.  Bill approaches her for advice on preparing for the interview.  Lorna has the actual interview questions asked of all applicants and considers making him a copy of the list so he can adequately prepare.

     

    Case 2:  Emily works in Quality Control.  Once a year, her supervisor gives away the refurbished computers to the local elementary school.  No specific records are kept of this type of transaction and Emily really needs a computer for her son who is in college.  Her supervisor asks her to deliver 12 computer systems to the school.

     

    Case 3:  Marvin is the secretary in the Facilities Management Department.  He has just received a new computer and wants to try it out.  Though his supervisor has a strict policy about computer use for business purpose only, he wants to learn the e-mail software more thoroughly than his training can provide.  One good way to do this, he figures, is to write e-mail messages to his friends and relatives until he gets the knack of it.  He is caught up on all his work and only has 30 minutes left to work today.  His supervisor left early.

     

    Case 4:  Richard and Conway are talking in the hallway about the employee benefits program.  Conway, who has had some recent financial trouble, explains to Richard how the benefits program has a loophole that will allow him to receive some financial assistance that he really needs to help pay health care costs for his mother.  Cathy, a fellow worker, overhears the conversation.  Later, Cathy is approached by her supervisor who says he heard a rumor that some people were taking advantage of the company benefits program.

     

    Case 5:  Jennie was recently hired to work as a receptionist for the from lobby.  As receptionist, she is responsible for making copies for the associates.  Her son, Bruce, comes in and needs some copies for a school project.  He brought his own paper and needs 300 copies for class.  If he doesn’t bring the copies with him, he will fail the project.  The company copier does not require a security key nor do they keep track of copies made by departments.

     

    Steps for Making Ethical Decisions

     

    • Identify the ethical issue or problem.
    • List the facts that have the most bearing on the decision.
    • Identify anyone who might be affected by your decision and how
    • Explain what each affected person would want you to do about the issue
    • List three alternative actions and identify the best and worst case scenario for each alternative, anyone who would be harmed by this choice (and how), any values that would be compromised by selecting this alternative and any automatic reasons why this alternative should not be selected (legal issues, rules, etc.).
    • Determine a course of action
    Comments (24)
  • 3D Printing

    Posted by Edmund Hathaway on 9/30/2013 9:03:30 AM
     http://gizmodo.com/scientists-can-now-3d-print-transplantable-living-kidn-1120783047
    Answer the following questions:
    1. What is the summary of the article.
    2. What are your positive and negative thoughts about the article.
    3. How do you react to the article on a personal level?  How does this relate to your experience?
    Comments (0)
  • RFID

    Posted by Edmund Hathaway on 5/13/2013 12:30:00 PM
     

    RFID Tags and Students

    Using radio frequency identification (RFID) technology isn't new. The government uses it to monitor livestock. Stores like Wal-mart use it to manage inventory. Chances are good that your college bookstore uses it too. And, every now and then, a school district makes headlines by trying to implement the same thing with students. As this Wired article explains, the Northside Independent School District in San Antonio, Texas began using the technology at the beginning of the school year in an effort to improve their attendance count, and subsequently, increase their level of funding.

    At this time, Northside's Student Locator Project is being piloted in one middle school and one high school within the district, which has 112 schools. The district explains that absenteeism can have a negative effect on the funds dispersed to the school, since the school receives a specified amount of money for each student present every day. If a student is marked absent, for whatever reason, the school doesn't get the money. However, students wearing RFID tags can be automatically checked in simply by having their tag read when they enter the building.

    The school claims that the RFID chips are not encrypted and track students via a unique serial number without providing any personal information. The RFID tag is designed to work only while the student is on school grounds. However, opponents cite concerns regarding the ability of others to create counterfeit cards to enable truancy, and the possibility that others could use their own RFID readers to scan the tags, in addition to the concerns regarding student privacy.

    Comments (15)
  • Data Mining and Privacy

    Posted by Edmund Hathaway on 5/13/2013 12:28:00 PM
     

    Data Mining and Privacy

    Every day we generate an amazing amount of data. According to a Mashable article by Patrick Tucker, the average American office worker generates about 5,000 megabytes of data per day. In less than 10 years, the amount of global data is expected to increase by 2,000 percent. We are creating videos and documents, sending email messages, uploading pictures, texting, and performing all sorts of other activities that contribute to this data explosion. Many believe that the data they are generating is anonymous, but as data mining becomes more prevalent, it is becoming easier to identify people, even through so-called anonymous data.

    Much of our personal data is already freely available. We provide it ourselves when we take online surveys, use Facebook, and sign up for newsletters, loyalty cards, and online services. Cell phone records are sold to merchants. MIT researchers claim that despite such information being "anonymized" it is possible to identify a specific user from just four different data points. Given enough data, researchers have shown that they can even predict your future movements and whereabouts with 80 percent accuracy

    Comments (0)
  • Technology in action

    Posted by Edmund Hathaway on 5/13/2013 8:13:00 AM
    Comments (0)
  • Ethics in computing

    Posted by Edmund Hathaway on 3/21/2013 9:48:24 AM
     Workplace Ethics Activity- Introduction to Business

    Making Informed Ethical Decisions

    Instructions

    You will be put into 4 groups.  Each group will be assigned all of the following scenarios to read and discuss.  Then, each group should follow the steps below for making ethical decisions.  Each group will select a recorder.  The recorder will write down everyone’s name in the group on a sheet of paper and the record the group’s responses for each scenario presented below.  Each group should select a feasible alternative and be prepared to discuss their reasoning for selecting that alternative with the class.

     

    Scenarios

    For all the scenarios, assume you are employed by Westerly High Computer Systems, a large computer manufacturing company with approximately 1000 employees. The company is located in a large metropolitan area.

     

    Case 1:  Lorna is an administrative assistant in the Human Resource Department.  Her good friend, Bill, is applying for a job with the company and she has agreed to serve as a reference for him.  Bill approaches her for advice on preparing for the interview.  Lorna has the actual interview questions asked of all applicants and considers making him a copy of the list so he can adequately prepare.

     

    Case 2:  Emily works in Quality Control.  Once a year, her supervisor gives away the refurbished computers to the local elementary school.  No specific records are kept of this type of transaction and Emily really needs a computer for her son who is in college.  Her supervisor asks her to deliver 12 computer systems to the school.

     

    Case 3:  Marvin is the secretary in the Facilities Management Department.  He has just received a new computer and wants to try it out.  Though his supervisor has a strict policy about computer use for business purpose only, he wants to learn the e-mail software more thoroughly than his training can provide.  One good way to do this, he figures, is to write e-mail messages to his friends and relatives until he gets the knack of it.  He is caught up on all his work and only has 30 minutes left to work today.  His supervisor left early.

     

    Case 4:  Richard and Conway are talking in the hallway about the employee benefits program.  Conway, who has had some recent financial trouble, explains to Richard how the benefits program has a loophole that will allow him to receive some financial assistance that he really needs to help pay health care costs for his mother.  Cathy, a fellow worker, overhears the conversation.  Later, Cathy is approached by her supervisor who says he heard a rumor that some people were taking advantage of the company benefits program.

     

    Case 5:  Jennie was recently hired to work as a receptionist for the from lobby.  As receptionist, she is responsible for making copies for the associates.  Her son, Bruce, comes in and needs some copies for a school project.  He brought his own paper and needs 300 copies for class.  If he doesn’t bring the copies with him, he will fail the project.  The company copier does not require a security key nor do they keep track of copies made by departments.

     

    Steps for Making Ethical Decisions

     

    • Identify the ethical issue or problem.
    • List the facts that have the most bearing on the decision.
    • Identify anyone who might be affected by your decision and how
    • Explain what each affected person would want you to do about the issue
    • List three alternative actions and identify the best and worst case scenario for each alternative, anyone who would be harmed by this choice (and how), any values that would be compromised by selecting this alternative and any automatic reasons why this alternative should not be selected (legal issues, rules, etc.).
    • Determine a course of action
    Comments (27)
  • Ethics

    Posted by Edmund Hathaway on 10/25/2012 8:41:15 AM
     Workplace Ethics Activity- Making Informed Ethical Decisions

    Instructions

    You will be put into 4 groups.  Each group will be assigned all of the following scenarios to read and discuss.  Then, each group should follow the steps below for making ethical decisions.  Each group will select a recorder.  The recorder will write down everyone’s name in the group on a sheet of paper and the record the group’s responses for each scenario presented below.  Each group should select a feasible alternative and be prepared to discuss their reasoning for selecting that alternative with the class.

    Scenarios

    For all the scenarios, assume you are employed by Westerly High Computer Systems, a large computer manufacturing company with approximately 1000 employees. The company is located in a large metropolitan area.

    Case 1:  Lorna is an administrative assistant in the Human Resource Department.  Her good friend, Bill, is applying for a job with the company and she has agreed to serve as a reference for him.  Bill approaches her for advice on preparing for the interview.  Lorna has the actual interview questions asked of all applicants and considers making him a copy of the list so he can adequately prepare.

    Case 2:  Emily works in Quality Control.  Once a year, her supervisor gives away the refurbished computers to the local elementary school.  No specific records are kept of this type of transaction and Emily really needs a computer for her son who is in college.  Her supervisor asks her to deliver 12 computer systems to the school.

    Case 3:  Marvin is the secretary in the Facilities Management Department.  He has just received a new computer and wants to try it out.  Though his supervisor has a strict policy about computer use for business purpose only, he wants to learn the e-mail software more thoroughly than his training can provide.  One good way to do this, he figures, is to write e-mail messages to his friends and relatives until he gets the knack of it.  He is caught up on all his work and only has 30 minutes left to work today.  His supervisor left early. 

    Case 4:  Richard and Conway are talking in the hallway about the employee benefits program.  Conway, who has had some recent financial trouble, explains to Richard how the benefits program has a loophole that will allow him to receive some financial assistance that he really needs to help pay health care costs for his mother.  Cathy, a fellow worker, overhears the conversation.  Later, Cathy is approached by her supervisor who says he heard a rumor that some people were taking advantage of the company benefits program.

    Case 5:  Jennie was recently hired to work as a receptionist for the from lobby.  As receptionist, she is responsible for making copies for the associates.  Her son, Bruce, comes in and needs some copies for a school project.  He brought his own paper and needs 300 copies for class.  If he doesn’t bring the copies with him, he will fail the project.  The company copier does not require a security key nor do they keep track of copies made by departments.

    Steps for Making Ethical Decisions

    • Identify the ethical issue or problem.
    • List the facts that have the most bearing on the decision.
    • Identify anyone who might be affected by your decision and how
    • Explain what each affected person would want you to do about the issue
    • List three alternative actions and identify the best and worst case scenario for each alternative, anyone who would be harmed by this choice (and how), any values that would be compromised by selecting this alternative and any automatic reasons why this alternative should not be selected (legal issues, rules, etc.).
    • Determine a course of action
    Comments (25)
  • The Future

    Posted by Edmund Hathaway on 9/25/2012 9:34:56 AM
    Comments (0)
  • Ethics

    Posted by Edmund Hathaway on 3/21/2012 12:45:18 PM
    Scenarios
    For all the scenarios, assume you are employed by Westerly High Computer Systems, a large computer manufacturing company with approximately 1000 employees. The company is located in a large metropolitan area.
     
    Case 1: Lorna is an administrative assistant in the Human Resource Department. Her good friend, Bill, is applying for a job with the company and she has agreed to serve as a reference for him. Bill approaches her for advice on preparing for the interview. Lorna has the actual interview questions asked of all applicants and considers making him a copy of the list so he can adequately prepare.
     
    Case 2: Emily works in Quality Control. Once a year, her supervisor gives away the refurbished computers to the local elementary school. No specific records are kept of this type of transaction and Emily really needs a computer for her son who is in college. Her supervisor asks her to deliver 12 computer systems to the school.
     
    Case 3: Marvin is the secretary in the Facilities Management Department. He has just received a new computer and wants to try it out. Though his supervisor has a strict policy about computer use for business purpose only, he wants to learn the e-mail software more thoroughly than his training can provide. One good way to do this, he figures, is to write e-mail messages to his friends and relatives until he gets the knack of it. He is caught up on all his work and only has 30 minutes left to work today. His supervisor left early.
     
    Case 4: Richard and Conway are talking in the hallway about the employee benefits program. Conway, who has had some recent financial trouble, explains to Richard how the benefits program has a loophole that will allow him to receive some financial assistance that he really needs to help pay health care costs for his mother. Cathy, a fellow worker, overhears the conversation. Later, Cathy is approached by her supervisor who says he heard a rumor that some people were taking advantage of the company benefits program.
     
    Case 5: Jennie was recently hired to work as a receptionist for the from lobby. As receptionist, she is responsible for making copies for the associates. Her son, Bruce, comes in and needs some copies for a school project. He brought his own paper and needs 300 copies for class. If he doesn’t bring the copies with him, he will fail the project. The company copier does not require a security key nor do they keep track of copies made by departments.
     
    Steps for Making Ethical Decisions
     
    • Identify the ethical issue or problem.
    • List the facts that have the most bearing on the decision.
    • Identify anyone who might be affected by your decision and how
    • Explain what each affected person would want you to do about the issue
    • List three alternative actions and identify the best and worst case scenario for each alternative, anyone who would be harmed by this choice (and how), any values that would be compromised by selecting this alternative and any automatic reasons why this alternative should not be selected (legal issues, rules, etc.).
    • Determine a course of action
    Comments (145)